WHY ASPHALT?

Welcome! This page is intended as a reference for those making the decision to pave driveways, parking lots,
roads, and paths using Hot Mix Asphalt.

The information contained herein is intended as a quick reference for those gathering or needing information and
has been condensed from other parts of the The Colorado Asphalt Pavement Association (CAPA) website.

Additional information can be found throughout the rest of the CAPA website .

More detailed information is available throughout the CAPA Resources Library.

ASPHALT MAN


Do you have a question about the placement or use of Asphalt Pavement?
So do others, Click here to view some questions which have already been submitted or
submit one for yourself to be added to the list.


WHY ASPHALT? – THE ASPHALT BENEFIT?

We were contacted recently by a consultant who was working on an Alternative Technical Concept (ATC) for a design/build project.
They were developing an ATC to use asphalt in lieu of the specified concrete pavement.

Key factors include minimizing inconvenience and maximizing safety of the motoring public. The asphalt advantage includes:
- Easier to maintain traffic using lane-by-lane construction.
- More options to maximize number of traffic lanes opened.
- Can be constructed in more narrow construction areas.
- Traffic can be returned to construction areas sooner after paving.
- Traffic allowed on pavement before top mat is paved.

For more information on the benefits of using Asphalt Pavement or help on a project, contact the CAPA Office
or visit asphaltroads.org and asphaltfacts.com.


WHY ASPHALT FOR THE COLORADO HIGH COUNTRY?

Asphalt is the preferred pavement of choice in the Colorado High Country because it:
- Reduces the cost of construction.
- The flexible nature of asphalt is better suited for the freeze/thaw cycles.
- Reduces the time of construction.
- Reduces the motorist impact during construction.
- It is easily maintained – at a lower cost and less motorist impact.
- Reduces snow and ice build up, thereby reducing road snow plowing costs.

ASPHALT AROUND THE USA

"Concrete Paving A Big Mistake Article
Boston Highway Chief: Concrete paving in Big Dig a 'mistake' Outlining plans to replace concrete pavement with asphalt on steep slopes in the Big Dig, the state's top highway official called the decision to use that material a "mistake" and one that transportation officials would not make today.
Read More Here



Perpetual Pavements – Build Them Right and Never Take Them Out!!
We are regularly asked the question, "…. How long do asphalt pavements last?” We are learning that the best response is a two part answer. It is generally between 10 – 15 years or more before some repair is done to the surface of the pavement. Sooner if pavement preservation techniques are used to keep a good road in good condition. It may be indefinitely, however, before the whole pavement is removed and replaced. If a pavement is built thick enough with the right components, they may be in place indefinitely and considered a perpetual pavement. (More info on Perpetual Pavements). An example of a Perpetual Pavement in Colorado, is the section of SH85, Platteville to Ft. Lupton (MP 245.7 to 250.5), first placed in 1957, the original pavement is still in place today – 55 years later.



ASPHALT PROMOTION

Asphalt is the preferred pavement of choice in the Colorado High Country because it:
- Reduces the cost of construction.
- The flexible nature of asphalt is better suited for the freeze/thaw cycles.
- Reduces the time of construction.
- Reduces the motorist impact during construction.
- It is easily maintained – at a lower cost and less motorist impact.
- Reduces snow and ice build up, thereby reducing road snow plowing costs.

ASPHALT IS STILL THE BEST VALUE

Question: Can an asphalt overlay be placed over a roadway with an existing chip seal?
Answer: Placing an overlay on a road with an existing chip seal surface is not unusual and for some standard practice. The tack coat is the most important issue. Get it even, apply it at the correct rate, use the proper materials, make sure it is set and make sure the surface is clean and dry before you start. No problem. For more information, contact Scott Shuler, CSU Construction Management, Associate Professor, 720-289-2153, scott.shuler@colostate.edu



From White to Black – Town of Castle Rock Reconstructs Several Concrete Streets in Asphalt Plum Creek Parkway, Woodlands Blvd., and Cherry Plum Way are getting a facelift this summer in the Town of Castle Rock. Sections of all three concrete streets placed in the mid 1980’s are now being reconstructed using asphalt pavement. The section of Plum Creek Parkway (see adjacent photo) is near the Douglas County Fairgrounds and was paved by CAPA Member Brannan Sand & Gravel. The other two streets are being paved by Schmidt Construction.



RELATED ASPHALT RESOURCES

National Asphalt Pavement Association: asphaltpavement.org
Asphalt Alliance: asphaltalliance.com
The Asphalt Institute: asphaltinstitute.org
National Center for Asphalt Technology: ncat.us
Pavement Noise: quietpavement.com
Environmental Issues: beyondroads.com